By Tenzin Pema, Tibet Policy Institute

His Holiness the Dalai Lama (Photo: Tenzin Lekshay)

I have always been deeply fascinated by the altruistic thoughts, words and deeds of my root guru His Holiness the Dalai Lama. He first thinks about all the sentient beings of the world on an equal level in terms of wanting happiness and not wanting sorrow. Being one among the seven billion human beings in the world, he takes the sole responsibility to promote human values, which are drastically being wiped out from this world. Being a religious practitioner, his contribution in promoting religious harmony in the whole world is unprecedented. Only after that, he counts the facts and aspirations of Tibet and Tibetans. No word and deed left for him to talk about his own family. He is the best well-wisher of all irrespective of caste, colour, creed, gender, etc. His teachings and words are the best lessons to the whole world to turn our mother Earth into a better place to live in. Recently on 9th March, Ms. Enee Xia, a Chinese human rights defender from United States told the gathering of Tibet Policy Institute staff that translating teachings of His Holiness The Dalai Lama in all the languages are essential to bring positive change, and to transform minds of people for the betterment of all. His teachings are the best solution to Tibet and China in particular and to the whole world at large.

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Let’s be honest

On March 19, 2012

By Tenzin Nyinjey

The last thing I do is read government publications. And the least of these are the ones produced by the Chinese government. Life is short and we have plenty of beautiful stuffs out there to read that can genuinely empower us. So why waste time by reading propagandas that are not even taken seriously by folks who produce them?

But this time I was a bit intrigued by an article published on some Tibet-China online, responding to Kalon Tripa’s speech on the recently-concluded 53rd anniversary of the Tibetan National Uprising Day. For the Chinese have done this after a long time, if I am not mistaken. 

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Thubten Samphel, Tibet Policy Institute

Sun Tzu also taught that ultimate excellence involved winning without fighting.

With the possible exception of the island nation of Taiwan, never in its more than 5,000 years of history has China’s imperial throne met a match like that of Tibet. The Mongols, on whose mighty imperial enterprise communist China lays its claim of legitimacy to rule the minorities, are now a people divided in two. Chinese settlers’ demographic assault on the traditional grazing grounds of the Mongols goes on at a ferocious pace. The Manchus, another nomadic people, who whipped China into its present imperial shape and size, are so totally assimilated into the mainstream that they are indistinguishable from the Chinese who they ruled from 1664 to 1911. Today at the last count only about twelve ageing Manchus can speak the language. The Uighurs of Eastern Turkestan, or what the Chinese call Xinjiang, are politically and militarily suppressed and, like other minorities, demographically flooded by Chinese settlers.

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Thubten Samphel, Tibet Policy Institute

Ran Yunfei says Chinese authorities are going overboard on Tibet (Photo: Ian Johnson/NYR)

In the old days when politics exercised the minds of most Chinese and not money as it does now, one of the nastiest abuses a Chinese communist could hurl at an enemy or a rival was that he or she was a running dog of America or of imperialism, or both.  The person so accused would spend wrenching weeks or months to write passionate self-criticism to prove that he or she was anything but. If the accusation stuck and in most cases it did, the running dog would find himself running for his dear life, from dark prison cells, from excruciating torture or gruelling struggle sessions. And that would be the end of a life of a running dog.

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DHARAMSHALA: On 15 February 2012, Kalon Tripa inaugurated the Tibet Policy Institute at the Kashag Secretariat in Dharamshala. Kalon Tripa said the institute aims to carry out comprehensive research works on all aspect of Tibet-related issues, which he underlined would help the administration in framing policies for the next fifty years and making the Tibet issue a competent case on the international platform.

Kalon Tripa speaks during the Inauguration of TPI at Kashag Secretariat

The Kashag attaches great importance to the Tibet Policy Institute, Kalon Tripa said, adding that a clear and in-depth research materials on every aspect of Tibet issue would play a pivotal role in framing policies and plans for the next fifty years.

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By Gyaltsen

TCV School Gopalpur in its formative years (Photo: Phuntsok Namgyal)

Education in exile has crossed its 50 year landmark since the first Tibetan school was established in 1960 with 50 students. Over the past 50 years the education landscape of the exile community has changed drastically. The days have passed when infrastructural facilities were inadequate, when the schools were understaffed, when qualified teachers were scarce and curriculum resources limited. Today, we have 76 Tibetan schools spread across India and Nepal in which about 21,000 students are receiving an education. It is not just the numbers that has ballooned. Most of these schools are on par with Indian public schools in terms of infrastructure facilities, curriculum resources, teacher’s qualifications and administrative functioning. In 2004, a new Education Policy that can meet the unique basic needs of Tibet was officially launched. Since then various efforts have been made to put this policy into action by the Department of Education. 

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Towards a New Development Paradigm

On February 19, 2012

By Kaydor

Photo: K. Wiefling

It is the seventies. Tibetans are rooting at various refugee camps in South Asia. Signs point towards a drawn-out struggle as the Chinese government ruthlessly consolidates its illegal occupation of Tibet. Tibetan leadership finds itself in a difficult predicament of having to sustain a community in exile while also making maximum efforts to find a path home. Schools, clinics, monasteries, and other development projects are needed. Central Tibetan Administration (CTA) prepares brief project descriptions; often this is unnecessary as aid flows in generously from India and other concerned foreign governments.

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KORA with Malcolm X

On February 4, 2012

By Tenzin Nyinjey

On Sunday mornings, I often visit Tsuklakhang. However, unlike popo-las and momo-las walking around with prayer wheels and rosaries in their hands, I carry an I-pod and a backpack filled with a laptop and books. Apart from having an opportunity to read a few lines, while taking rest on a boulder in the mountains that echoes with melodies of chirping birds, the books in my backpack gives an added advantage—they shower me with that extra bit of weight on my shoulders, resulting in a sort of good physical exercise much needed by those of us who are engaged in so-called intellectual labor.

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Music as Empowerment!

On December 17, 2011

By Tenzin Nyinjey

While watching a talk show on television a year or so ago, I was struck by American writer and activist Cornel West when he referred to the need of what he calls as ‘danceable education’ for today’s restless youth most of whom couldn’t endure reading books.

West said that the phrase ‘danceable education’ was coined by the famous German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and refers to the use of art and music, not just for entertainment, but also to educate and edify the hearts, minds and souls of young people. In short, music as an instrument to enlighten, empower and serve people!  

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By Dicki Chhoyang

Kalon Tripa and Kalons of 14th Kashag

With the recent election of Dr. Lobsang Sangay, a young, western-educated, and charismatic  new Kalon Tripa, there is a general sense of renewed vitality in our movement that is palpable across the Tibetan diaspora and, reportedly, also inside Tibet.  The Kalon Tripa and his Kashag, bear the great responsibility of providing leadership in a historically unprecedented transition that is the transfer of political authority from H.H. the Dalai Lama to a secular democratically elected government.

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